Deze pakkende fotoreeks kaart verboden liefde over heel de wereld aan

Instagram @hammond_robin
Hoewel ze jaren celstraf riskeren, poseren deze mannen en vrouwen trots voor de lens van de Amerikaanse fotograaf Robin Hammond. Die trok de wereld rond om holebi's te fotograferen in landen waar hun seksuele voorkeur nog steeds verboden is. Of die uit een omgeving komen waarin hun geaardheid niet wordt aanvaard. Met de erg knappe fotoreeks 'Where Love Is Illegal' als resultaat.

Robin Hammond kwam op het idee voor deze fotoreeks, toen hij als fotograaf voor National Geographic in Nigeria was. Daar werden vijf mannen voor zijn ogen gearresteerd en publiekelijk aan de schandpaal genageld, alleen omdat ze homo zijn. Hij besloot als reactie daarop de organisatie Where Love Is Illegal op te starten, die zich inzet voor holebi's in landen waar homoseksualiteit illegaal is. De gelijknamige fotoreeks volgde iets later.

Hammond vond al een kleine honderd mensen uit heel wat verschillende landen die het aandurfden om voor zijn lens te poseren. Onder andere ook de Turkse Kemal uit België. "Ik ben een Turkse moslim en ben uit de kast gekomen toen ik vijftien jaar oud was. Voor mijn familie was dit allesbehalve oké. Daarom ben ik op mezelf gaan wonen met niets op zak toen ik 17 jaar was. Nu twaalf jaar later voel ik me sterker en krachtiger dan ooit," vertelt hij. Kemal is ondertussen getrouwd en heeft een eigen kapsalon in Oudenaarde. 

Bekijk een selectie van Hammonds werk hieronder:

“My uncle came to our room, dragged me from the bed. On top of his voice, saying I'm a disgrace, I'm a curse, I'm a criminal that needed to be killed. He went to the kitchen, and got a big wood, and started beating me with it. I bled. He campaigned other people to beat me up, and here, some neighbors came to rescue me, 'cause they wouldn't let me be killed in the neighborhood.” James is a gay man from Uganda. After his uncle attacked him he fled Uganda and became a refugee in Kenya. He hoped for a safer life in Kenya, but was instead met with the same discrimination. “I've been chased from houses, because the citizens think every Ugandan refugee here is a homosexual, and they don't want us to teach our evil habits to their community.” - Many LGBTQI+ east Africans have sought safety in Kenya. They often find though that homophobia, biphobia and transphobia is just as prevalent. - Where Love is Illegal traveled to Kenya, Mozambique and Ghana with the support of Elton John AIDS Foundation (@ejaf @ejafdn) to continue our work sharing LGBTQI+ stories of survival and to raise awareness of the impacts of stigma. Around the world, grants made by the Elton John AIDS Foundation make possible the work of countless community-rooted organizations that touch the lives of millions every day. For more information, and to join the fight, visit www.ejaf.org - Click the link in our profile to read James’ story and to see how to share your own experience of #survival and #discrimination and learn how you can support. Photo by @Hammond_Robin / @noorimages. This is a @witness_change project. For more stories of survival follow @WhereLoveIsIllegal

Een foto die is geplaatst door null (@whereloveisillegal) op

“My mother told me that I had to take a test at the time. I did not take it very seriously, but I knew that I got involved with people infected, who I had sex with ...those people using no protection.” Jennifer is a #transgender woman from #Mozambique. Jennifer faced discrimination due to her gender identity causing her to lose jobs. She turned to sex work as a means of survival, however sex work is risky and has exposed her to HIV. “After taking the test, the test was positive. And when it was positive, I came back home and I did not tell anybody about it. My mother asked, and I always said ‘ahh I have not done it yet’ but I was already taking medication. So I was ashamed of it all at that time I was going to get more medication then I gave up on medication.” - In Mozambique more than a third of gay men and transgender women have HIV, but, because of stigma, many don’t have access to care. New hope comes in the form of a program that will test thousands for HIV, as well as train LGBTQI+ people to test their peers confidentially and in their own homes. - This work along with stories from Kenya, Mozambique and Ghana are currently being shared at #AIDS2018, the 22nd International @aids_conference, Amsterdam, Netherlands with the support of Elton John AIDS Foundation (@ejaf @ejafdn) who help continue our work sharing LGBTQ+ stories of survival and to raise awareness of the impacts of stigma. Around the world, grants made by the Elton John AIDS Foundation make possible the work of countless community-rooted organizations that touch the lives of millions every day. For more information, and to join the fight, visit www.ejaf.org - Click the link in our profile to read Jennifer’s story and to see how to share your own experience of #survival and #discriminationand learn how you can support. Photo by @Hammond_Robin / @noorimages. This is a @witness_change project. For more stories of survival follow @WhereLoveIsIllegal

Een foto die is geplaatst door null (@whereloveisillegal) op

“There was a time in my life that I thought I was the only person of my kind on Earth, was very lonely, emotionally traumatized and looking for people I can relate to.” Effery is a transgender woman from Ghana. In order to safely navigate life in Ghana she can not present her true self when she is out in the world. “When I'm outside the house I have to pretend I'm the boss. I need to walk more masculine, not very feminine, like the way I feel when I'm in the house. And the way I talk too sometimes when I'm out, I have to be very careful because when you start talking and you start being all fabulous and all gay, they'll raise eyebrows. So when I'm out there and I'm talking I need to talk straight. I need to act straight.” - In #Ghana, only a brave few dare show their face and publicly say they identify as LGBTQI+, most live in the shadows fearing discrimination, hatred and violence if they lived openly. - Where Love is Illegal traveled to Kenya, Mozambique and Ghana with the support of Elton John AIDS Foundation (@ejaf @ejafdn) to continue our work sharing LGBTQI+ stories of survival and to raise awareness of the impacts of stigma. Around the world, grants made by the Elton John AIDS Foundation make possible the work of countless community-rooted organizations that touch the lives of millions every day. For more information, and to join the fight, visit www.ejaf.org - Click the link in our profile to read Effery’s story and to see how to share your own experience of #survival and #discrimination and learn how you can support. Photo by @Hammond_Robin / @noorimages. This is a @witness_change project. For more stories of survival follow @WhereLoveIsIllegal

Een foto die is geplaatst door null (@whereloveisillegal) op

“I am a homosexual man, but all the time I was kind of having some girls' style, like the way I walk, the way I talk, the way I express myself. And people would notice that. People were actually saying some very ugly names because the way I was expressing myself, the way I was standing myself in being in this environment.” Frank is a queer person from Mozambique. Although society has not always been accepting of Frank, their family has loved them since coming out. - In Mozambique more than a third of gay men have HIV, but, because of stigma, many don’t have access to care. New hope comes in the form of a program that will test thousands for HIV, as well as train LGBTQI+ people to test their peers confidentially and in their own homes. - Where Love is Illegal traveled to Kenya, Mozambique and Ghana with the support of Elton John AIDS Foundation (@ejaf @ejafdn) to continue our work sharing LGBTQI+ stories of survival and to raise awareness of the impacts of stigma. Around the world, grants made by the Elton John AIDS Foundation make possible the work of countless community-rooted organizations that touch the lives of millions every day. For more information, and to join the fight, visit www.ejaf.org - Click the link in our profile to read Frank’s story and to see how to share your own experience of #survival and #discriminationand learn how you can support. Photo by @Hammond_Robin / @noorimages. This is a @witness_changeproject. For more stories of survival follow @WhereLoveIsIllegal

Een foto die is geplaatst door null (@whereloveisillegal) op

“It was the year 2013 1st April, when I met Lucky at the birthday party of a friend of mine. When I looked at him, I liked him, and he had all the qualities that I wanted for someone to love.” John (right), a gay man, and Lucky (left) a transgender woman, met and fell in love in their native Uganda. They were lived together when John’s family discovered their relationship and attempted to kill them. They fled to Kenya where they now live as refugees. “When they attacked him, he managed to escape. He ran away, and then, he told me, ‘Don’t come back home, because even me have left home, cause your parents went there to kill me. They realized that we are gays.’” - Many LGBTQI+ east Africans have sought safety in Kenya. They often find though that homophobia, biphobia and transphobia is just as prevalent. - Where Love is Illegal traveled to Kenya, Mozambique and Ghana with the support of Elton John AIDS Foundation (@ejaf @ejafdn) to continue our work sharing LGBTQI+ stories of survival and to raise awareness of the impacts of stigma. Around the world, grants made by the Elton John AIDS Foundation make possible the work of countless community-rooted organizations that touch the lives of millions every day. For more information, and to join the fight, visit www.ejaf.org - Click the link in our profile to read John & Lucky story and to see how to share your own experience of #survival and #discriminationand learn how you can support. Photo by @Hammond_Robin / @noorimages. This is a @witness_change project. For more stories of survival follow @WhereLoveIsIllegal

Een foto die is geplaatst door null (@whereloveisillegal) op

“Most times, I feel for a woman and I most times get a woman to satisfy myself. I am married for three years, and I have never come out to my family or my husband.” A.K. is a bisexual woman from Ghana. Her family is strongly religious and she would be in danger to tell them her sexuality. “But I won't deny that I love my husband that I'm staying with. And the woman that I also have sexual intercourse with, I also love her. I don't know, I just love them both. So I know I am, I won't say it's a mistake”.” - In #Ghana, only a brave few dare show their face and publicly say they identify as LGBTQI+, most live in the shadows fearing discrimination, hatred and violence if they lived openly. - Where Love is Illegal traveled to Kenya, Mozambique and Ghana with the support of Elton John AIDS Foundation (@ejaf @ejafdn) to continue our work sharing LGBTQI+ stories of survival and to raise awareness of the impacts of stigma. Around the world, grants made by the Elton John AIDS Foundation make possible the work of countless community-rooted organizations that touch the lives of millions every day. For more information, and to join the fight, visit www.ejaf.org - Click the link in our profile to read AK’s story and to see how to share your own experience of #survival and #discriminationand learn how you can support. Photo by @Hammond_Robin / @noorimages. This is a @witness_change project. For more stories of survival follow @WhereLoveIsIllegal

Een foto die is geplaatst door null (@whereloveisillegal) op




5 reacties

Alle reacties worden voor publicatie gelezen -en goed- of afgekeurd- door het moderatie-team van HLN. Elke reactie moet voldoen aan deze gedragsregels.
Je naam en voornaam verschijnen bij je reactie.


  • Patrick De pauw

    Grensoverschrijdend gedrag is dat

  • Eida Lam

    VAlt weer vooral niet op dat ze bijna zonder uitzondering, wééral uit een moslim land komen.

  • David Lievens

    Inderdaad John, België was zelfs het eerste land waar het kon. Of het tweede na Nederland, maar ik dacht het eerste. Mij maakt het allemaal niet uit wie voor wie kiest. Als twee mensen elkaar graag zien, laat ze er beiden voor gaan. Daarmee doe je niemand kwaad. Dat uw buur het haat, dat is zijn probleem. Het is vooral zielig.

  • ISABEL FRANCOIS

    Inderdaad John,ik dacht net hetzelfde.

  • John Verschraeghen

    Wel jammer dat ook België wordt vermeld als land “whereloveisillegal”. Voor zover ik weet laat onze wet het gewoon toe dat mensen van hetzelfde geslacht huwen. In het geval van Kemal is het zijn familie en z’n geloof dat zijn geaardheid afwees, niet de Belgische wet.